Welcome to astrofoto.org!

Moon, 2005 Mar 16Here you will find the fruits of our hobby. Well, for Maria it is a hobby; for Roland it is closer to an obsession. Still, this is where you will find some of the fruits of that work. In March of 2000, we purchased an 8-inch Newtonian reflector on a Dobsonian mount from Orion Telescopes, the SkyQuest XT8.

Using the telescope was a learning experience, especially since time and responsibilities did not allowed us to get to any star parties or meet members from any clubs in the area for nearly a year. Usenet news on sci.astro.amateur was a lifesaver. Most of the time we were viewing from our 3rd story porch in Queens (in the eastern part of New York City). Views to the west were compromised by massive light pollution from Manhattan and during the coldest months the city generates significant heat that ruins the seeing even as high as 60 degrees above the horizon. Still, there are plenty of things which can be seen with the 8-inch scope, or for that matter, with our 10x50 binoculars.

In October of 2002 we moved to Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. We no longer have the 3rd floor porch, but the skies actually seem to be darker. Some of this is because we are near the water which means that in some directions there really is less light pollution. We've also acquired some camera equipment and a several telescopes as Roland has gone on a shopping spree (not really, it just kind of accumulates). At this point we have a couple of smaller scopes includeing a 90mm f/5 refractor, its bigger brother, a Orion 120ST 120mm f/5, and older Tasco 60mm f/11 (or so, not quite sure), and an Orion Apex 127mm. And since the imaging bug bit, I've acquired a Losmandy GM-8 mount with Gemini GOTO and an older "push-to" Mountain Instruments MI-250 mount. Storage is a problem, but having enough scopes for kids activities is not.

Really installing Oracle Java on Fedora

This has nothing to do with astronomy at all, but I can't find a goo place to save this information. So...

If you're trying to install Oracle's Java on Fedora, after you've done,so, the following will set up all of the alternatives links you want/need

Feeds Updated

A lot of the incoming RSS feeds were dead, so I spent a couple of hours today to find replacements. This is as much for me as for you so I have one place to go for my space and astronomy news. I need to put togther another physics set of feeds, too, then I'm good.I also finally took the time to get the image links working correctly. The URL rewriting was a bit finicky and things had to be done in the right order, but it all appears to be working now.

So what exactly has happened to this site....

I've clearly been on a long hiatus from posting here, largely because life has a way to doing that to you from time to time.... I've still be out doing some observing, playing with equipment, and more. But I have two teenage boys now and have taken on the role of Scoutmaster in a local Boy Scout troop. The side effect has been limited time for astronomy and some equipment that is languishing from neglect.

NSTA STEM Expo 2013: Common Core and the NGSS

The first talk I attended had Steven Pruitt, a representative from Achieve Inc., and Juan Carlos Aguilar, from the Georgia Department of Education. I won't bore you with all my notes on the talk, but there were a couple of interesting points made which warrant some comments.

NSTA STEM Expo 2013

I spent three days at the NSTA STEM Expo in St. Louis last week and over the next few days, I'm going to try to do a few posts related to the sessions I attended and things I learned (and cool freebies I learned about on the web).This is the second year I've attended, and while most of the sessions were not, unsurprisingly, about astronomy, they were all relevant to science and science education which is an underlying theme for my interest in astronomy.

Globe At Night

It's that time again. Actually, Globe At Night is running multiple campaigns, the first is going on right now, but there are others later in the year including later this month. Have a look. If you've never done this before, it's a great way of participating in a citizen science project, learning a little about astronomy, and a bit more about the impact of human activities on the environment.

Okay, really back online now....

Well, our post-Sandy migration is nominally complete at this point. Pictures and all.

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